Yearly Archives: 2014

Running OpenBUGS through R

This is just a quick note on using OpenBUGS in R. This is particularly handy if you need to run a series of models on a data set, or if you need to manipulate the output of Bayesian analyses in

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Some software options for Bayesian statistics on 64-bit Linux

So, you’ve been living the dream that is 64-bit Linux ownership, but you want to do Bayesian stats using the BUGS language. We’ve all been there…Okay, this is kind of niche, but here are some notes on what you can

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The great caffeine conundrum

More and more of us are routinely logging data about our health and wellbeing. How can we use that data to inform and adapt our behaviour? How can we avoid over-interpreting what we experience? Here’s a real-world example.

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Ebola screening

What are the arguments over ebola screening really about? Here’s my go at explaining, with a bit of help from the Reverend Bayes.

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Bayesian statistics

Bayesian approaches to statistics use simple ideas about contingent probability (i.e. the probability of one thing, given that another thing is true). They extend these ideas to look at the extent to which we should believe one thing, given a

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Gnuplot: Some basics

The world is replete with amazing programmes that make life for numpties like me much easier. Graphing tools are something I particularly like. As someone who has to work on a range of different operating systems, cross-platform graphing tools are

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Big Data, Big Knowledge: marketing hype or the future of human understanding?

Data. There’s a lot of it about. If you work in the buzzword driven world of consultancy or large corporations (including the industries of academia and government), you have the dubious pleasure of having it rammed down your throat at

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Random and fixed effect models

In meta-analysis, it is common to talk about random- and fixed-effect models. This can get pretty confusing, because fixed- and random-effects models exist outside meta-analysis as well. As a result, there is a short and a long answer to this

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Network meta-analysis

Meta-analysis is the statistical aggregation of data from a number of studies in order to answer a question. As an example, when considering the efficacy of a treatment, one may pool the results of multiple trials comparing the treatment to

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Meta-analysis

Meta-analysis is the statistical aggregation and analysis of data from multiple studies. When the studies included are properly selected and the data are aggregated appropriately, it uses more of the available information than a single study and so should be

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